The first IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Awardwas attributed to Professor Joseph WEIZENBAUM, MIT, Cambridge, Massachussets (USA), on January 11, 1991.

Here is an except from the official Report:

For over three decades, Professor Weizenbaum has made an outstanding contribution to the field of computer science, publishing widely in both English and German. Moreover, WG9.2 believes that since the appearance of his book, Computer Power and Human Reason in 1976, Professor Weizenbaum has raised some of the most essential questions in the area of information technology, questions which many computer scientists prefer to remain unspoken. Here is an author whose main contention is that his message be heard precisely by computer scientists, researchers, teachers, and students. His Computer Power and Human Reason is read widely all over the world, and perceived as a prime example of the way in which a computer scientist can raise the human side of information technology. Professor Weizenbaum's humanistic approach is not only presented in this book, but also in his numerous articles and media appearances. Famous are his debates with Daniel Bell, Herbert Simon, and A. Newell.

Professor Weizenbaum outlines clearly the recent developments in computing power, explaining computing theories and models, the use of information technology, natural language processing, and artificial intelligence. His style is warm, explicit, erudite, and yet does not blind with science. Nevertheless, the most important element of his contributions is his courageous appeal for human responsibility. To Professor Weizenbaum, "can", in relation to computing, does not mean "ought". Information has been created by human beings, and it can also be recreated by human beings.

In the opinion of WG9.2, Professor Weizenbaum's thinking parallels and supports the work of WG9.2 now and into the future. By offering this award to Professor Weizenbaum, a man is honoured who symbolises the courage it takes to make public statements which create a better awareness of the social implications of information technology.

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The second IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Awardwas attributed, in May 1993, to Dr. Riccardo PETRELLA, Head of the Forecasting and Assessment of Science and Technology (FAST) Programme at the Commission of the European Communities (CEC).

Here is an except from the official Report:

As the Head of FAST, Riccardo PETRELLA "has pioneered studies and actions on issues related to social sciences within the CEC research and development activities, at a time when the concern for social sciences was virtually non-existent and this type of study neglected", as a MONITOR Evaluation Panel report mentioned recently. FAST has been successful in making research and development (R&D) policy makers from the European Commission and its member countries aware of many challenging issues. These include, but are not limited to, new anthropocentric (human centred) production systems, the increasing importance of cities for R&D, European integration and its effects on less developed regions, Community cohesion, technological and economic globalization, and scientific infrastructures for observing the social shaping of science, technology and innovation.

Through his tireless activity, Dr. Riccardo PETRELLA has created a real "FAST culture". Its tangible results have been the European Conferences on Technology Assessment (Amsterdam-1987, Milan-1990, Copenhagen-1992) and the Technology Assessment (TA) institutions set up at European, national or regional levels. This culture is spread through networks like the European Parliamentary Technology Assessment Network (EPTA).

Dr. Riccardo PETRELLA is a "TA globetrotter": he is Visiting Professor at numerous universities and organizations throughout Europe, North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia. He is also a prolific writer: popularizing FAST ideas and activities, and dedicated to justice and generous policies. He is also an institutional man who knows that initiatives are established more effectively when encompassed by institutions. Responding to the contemporary challenges of our world, he is making the bureaucracy of Europe more benevolent by taking into account the real men and women of our complex, multi-cultural societies. Perhaps above all, Riccardo PETRELLA is simply a friendly man.

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The third IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award was attributed, in January 1996, to Carlos-Alberto AFONSO (IBASE, Brazil), as the representative of the community of people and the group of persons forming AlterNex.

Here is an except from the official Report:

The AlterNex network in Brazil was founded in 1989. It is a member of APC (Association for Progressive Communications) and is run by IBASE (Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analyses), an independent non-profit consultancy and research NGO founded in 1981 by a group of Brazilian social scientists, computer experts and others who lived abroad in Latin America, Europe, USA and Canada during the years of repression in Brazil. Today AlterNex has almost 6,000 direct accounts, linking countless users from agency networks, nodes and BBS (Bulletin Board Systems) installations, from within Brazil and across the continent.

Since 1989, AlterNex, IBASE and IBASEís Director Carlos-Alberto Afonso have become a beacon to networking efforts in other developing countries, and an inspiration to all. They have maintained an unrelenting commitment to social justice, sustainable social and economic development and the principle of participatory democracy.

Across Latin America, around the world, within the NGOsí networking movement, and in all efforts to build up sustained capacity at the grassroots level, the advice and competence of the AlterNex community is widely sought and widely respected. It is in fact this holistic approach which was the most important reason to award AlterNex. AlterNex shifted to a realisation of technology not as a physical object, or the product of a single person, but as integral to a dynamic community of persons, institutions, and processes, integrating this ëvirtual workspace and economic resourcesí into the daily lives, struggles and aspirations of society at large.

It is consistent with the spirit of AlterNex and IBASE that the award goes first to AlterNex as a real vehicle for social progress in the service of civil society. The honour by implication is also bestowed upon the institutions and individuals who have made AlterNex what it is today. To honour AlterNex, as the embodiment of some of the best that information technology has to offer for the human condition, is in turn to honour IBASE as an institution, Carlos-Alberto Afonso as a person, and the countless volunteers and users across the AlterNex network.

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The fourth IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award was attributed, in January 1998, to Professor Gunilla BRADLEY (home page) (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden University of Umeä and Mid Sweden University).

Here is an except from the official Report:

Gunilla Bradley, professor in Technology and Social Change at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, and now professor in Informatics at the University of Umeä and at Mid Sweden University, is a pioneer within interdisciplinary research concerning IT and its impacts and the interrelations between techniques, organisations and humans. In her work, she has always refrained from fractionalising to keep a holistic perspective and she has never tired in her mission to put forward human needs and possibilities in relation to IT structures. Her internationally successful text book Computers and the Psychosocial Work Environment presents the essence of her continuous research: work places and environments that are psycho-socially sound produce viable and profitable services and products. This was first outlined in her Ph.D. thesis in 1972 and has been pursued nationally and internationally since in enterprises and government organisations. Her work has influenced lawmakers to include in laws the need for psychological and social adaptation of work to human factors, and she has influenced scholars all over the world through lectures, conferences and textbooks. Today, her work remains cross-disciplinary by comparing and analysing societal and psychosocial challenges in modern IT domains, such as rural versus suburban communities and various interactive creative learning environments. Her dedication enlightens us all concerning the need for true human qualities in the IT era.

Gunilla Bradley also stands out as a role-model for women in IT, encouraging researchers of many disciplines to follow their own minds, even though it is not always the fashion of the day. She has persistently underlined the needs and possibilities of all those women who historically, in batch systems, in on-line systems with display terminals and micro-computers, made up the basic work force required for the developments that led to todayÕs and tomorrowÕs IT systems - in this way empowering humans on all levels with the knowledge of what is needed to carry out human-oriented, viable but also economically feasible developments.

In the opinion of WG9.2, the work of Professor Gunilla Bradley firmly supports the work and spirit of WG9.2 now and into the future. By offering this award to Professor Bradley, a women is honoured who symbolises the persistence required to create better awareness of the social implications of information technology.

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The fifth IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award has been granted, on January 14th 2000, to Professor Simon ROGERSON of the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, U.K. (http://www.ccsr.cse.dmu.ac.uk/)

Here is an excerpt of the official Report:

Simon Rogerson is one of the most important researchers on ethics of computing and information and communication technology ethics in the United Kingdom. He is director and teacher at the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility (CCSR) at De Montfort University, Leicester, United Kingdom, which he founded in 1995.
As Director of CCSR, Simon Rogerson has pioneered ethics of computing research and education. He conceived and directs the ongoing ETHICOMP conference series (Leicester 1995, Madrid 1996, Rotterdam 1998, Rome 1999) which provides a European forum to discuss the ethical and social impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) development and applications. He has connections with the recently created Australian Institute for Computer Ethics (AICE) and several North American institutions working on Ethics of Computing. CCSR's web site (http://www.ccsr.cms.dmu.ac.uk/), which Simon Rogerson launched in 1996, is now recognised as one of the leading reference sites on the subject and each month is visited by many thousands of people from around the world.
Simon Rogerson also leads the "Advances in Social Responsibility in the Information Age programme that is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, U.K., with further sponsorship by Royal Mail.
His recent publication, Ethical aspects of information technology: Issues for senior executives, for the Institute of Business Ethics, is one the few to address ethics of computing from a corporate perspective.
Simon Rogerson was recently appointed as Professor in Computer Ethics at De Montfort University within the Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering. It is believed to be the first professorship of its kind in the U.K. and recognises the field as an important area for research.
By giving Simon Rogerson the 5th IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award, we emphasise the need to place the study of ethics on the agenda of international ICT research and practices.

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The sixth IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award has been granted, on August 27th, 2002, to Dr. Deborah HURLEY, Director of the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project (http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/ii), Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., USA, during a ceremony which took place in Montreal, at the occasion of the IFIP 17th World Computer Congress.

Here is an excerpt of the official Report:

Ms Deborah Hurley has made and continues to make an outstanding contribution with international impact to awareness of the social implications of information technology.

The broad range of Ms Hurley's work over the years on such issues as security, intellectual property rights, technology transfer, and ethics is particularly close to the holistic and multidisciplinary approach used by working group 9.2 on computers and social accountability. Her work is completely international, covering countries from Korea to Kuwait, Europe and America. Ms Hurley manifests an openness to different facets of study, research, teaching, and social activism and to working with and among different countries internationally, which we believe makes her an extremely worthy candidate and a veritable symbol of our work and activities.

To give the Award to Ms Hurley is to recognise the work of a person who has been a leading pioneer in the field of information systems research in its application to the issues of security, privacy, communication, and information policy governance. It recognises both Ms Hurley's past work, and her current and ongoing activities.

From 1988 to 1996, Ms Hurley produced seminal work at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), in the field of information security network, and was responsible for the drafting, negotiation and the adoption of the 'Guidelines for Security of Information Systems'. These guidelines have had major international importance and global influence. In their development, Ms Hurley's work incorporated an entirely new and social approach to the privacy field. She was highly successful in gaining international support and implementation for the guidelines in many countries around the world while maintaining a line of personal independence.

Her later work for the OECD concentrated on areas such as intellectual property right protection and new environmental and energy technologies to respond to global climate change.

The award of the Namur Award also gives positive support to the ongoing and future research that Ms Hurley leads at the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project in her role as Director. The Project forms an independent, interdisciplinary forum that exists to address a wide range of emerging policy issues related to information infrastructure, its development, use and growth. It currently includes informative and socially thoughtful work on electronic commerce, the Internet and governance, and the global availability of advanced communications. In this area there lies much hope in the provision of new and socially-oriented insights into the globalisation of communication and information policy governance.

In addition, Ms Hurley presently holds a number of posts and positions on various important committees examining crucial legal, ethical, and social issues on science, the law, and policies relating to information technology.

Ms Hurley's teaching is exemplary: her holistic approach brings together admirably both international theory and practice on the relationship of the individual and governments in the digital age. It reflects the involvement of a particularly wide range of actors - national governments, business, international organisations, citizens, individuals, and other actors. This broadness of approach and involvement of many different constituencies has been typical of Ms Hurley's active, constructive, committed and activist work over the past two decades.

Ms Hurley's absolute and holistic commitment to creating an international awareness of the social implications of information technology - as manifested in her work in the past and in the present - appears to IFIP Working Group 9.2 to suggest a particularly promising venture for mutual activities in the future.

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The Seventh IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award has been granted, on Friday January 16th, 2004, to Professor Ian H. WITTEN, New Zealand Digital Library Project Leader, Department of Computer Science, University of Waikato, New Zealand
Here is an excerpt of the official Report:
Some 10 years ago, Prof. Witten established the New Zealand Digital Library project at the University of Waikato. Since then he has led the development of a software system known as Greenstone. Over the past decade, Ian Witten has strongly and clearly articulated the desire to build technologies that fully consider social implications, and to further the awareness of such issues.
The aim of the software is to empower users, particularly in universities, libraries, and other public service institutions, to build their own digital libraries. Greenstone is an important part of a potentially radical reformation of how information is disseminated in the fields of education, science and culture around the world, and particularly in developing countries.
The system has been used internationally for a wide range of purposes. For example, working with UNESCO, the project team has built huge collections of humanitarian information for developing countries. In New Zealand, and elsewhere, it has been deployed in the vital task of cultural heritage preservation. Large organisations, like the British Broadcasting Corporation, and small ones, like primary schools in the UK, and elsewhere, have all benefited through use of the system.
Prof. Ian H. Witten and his group have also worked hard to ensure that the technology can be used globally and by people of many diverse backgrounds – for instance, there are Greenstone Digital Libraries using Russian, Chinese, Maori, Kazakh, French and many other languages. The technology is not just for the conventionally literate – for example, there is a First Aid collection that uses only pictures; and a folk-music library to which users can sing their requests.
In conclusion, then, Ian Witten, his team, and the Greenstone system have become a powerful catalyst for bridging the digital divide, preserving and sharing cultural heritage and empowering people and organisations globally to develop and disseminate important new digital libraries. In doing so, he has greatly helped to show how technology may realise human potential. For these outstanding contributions, we honour Prof. Ian H.Witten with the IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award, today.

The Eight IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award has been granted, on Friday January 13th, 2006, to Mr. Nigel WILLIAMS
Founder of Childnet International and Northern Ireland Commissioner for children and young people

Here is an excerpt of the official Report:

Today, we are honouring a person who has devoted his career to promoting positive, transforming uses of computing technologies in society.
Founding the charity, Childnet International, in 1995, his desire was to ensure a strong voice advocating the interests and rights of children, to establish a charity that was balanced promoting the positive ways in which the Internet could benefit children and young people, whilst at the same time responding to children’s rights to be protected in the new cyberspace. It was this balanced approach that gained respect from a wide range of sectors including Government, industry, education, the media and most importantly children and young people themselves.
As the charity’s first Chief Executive Officer, Nigel initiated and developed a wide range of ground-breaking projects for Childnet, which have contributed significantly to making the Internet and web a better place for children and young people. Over the decade Childnet’s influence has been deep and wide; some examples of its work under Nigel’s leadership include:
• The establishment of the INHOPE association - of Internet Hotlines across Europe and the world, which works to identify illegal and harmful web content, and malicious Internet use.
• The charity’s award-winning education and training resources for schools on the safe use of the Internet which includes Chatdanger.com – the world’s first dedicated website giving advice to young people on the dangers of using interactive online services.
• Childnet’s international Awards and Academy competition for young people who are working on positive ideas for Internet use which over 8 years have been held in London, Sydney, Barbados, Washington, Paris, and Jamaica.
And in addition to these innovative projects, Childnet has also contributed significantly to very many governmental policy debates both in the UK and globally.
Nigel has been actively involved in shaping the policies and technologies supporting accessibility of Internet services. He has been a board member of the Internet Watch Foundation, and the Internet Content Rating Association. His standing was highlighted in 2001 when the United Kingdom Home Secretary appointed him to the Task Force on Child Protection on the Internet.
In July 2003, Nigel left Childnet to take up his current post as Northern Ireland Commissioner for children and young people. In this capacity he is charged with safeguarding children and young people, helping them, “challenge and change the world in which they live”. In a world where information and computing technologies are developing faster than society can understand their impact, the future, our children, are well served by this commission and its first commissioner.
We have great pleasure today, then, in recognising, celebrating and encouraging Nigel’s outstanding contributions of the awareness of the social implications of information technology by awarding him the 2006 Eighth IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award.

The Ninth IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award has been granted, on Friday January 11th, 2008, to Daniel Pimienta, Founder and President of FUNREDES (Fundación Redes y Desarrollo), Santo Domingo

Here is an except from the official Report:

Today, we are honouring a person who has dedicated his professional life to raising awareness of the social implications surrounding information technology, promoting its use in and for the developing world, and utilising it in the creation of virtual networks founded on ethical and democratic values.
In 1993, Daniel launched the Foundation Networks & Development (FUNREDES) an international NGO in Santo Domingo, dedicated to the dissemination of New Information and Communication Technologies (NICT) in developing countries with the objective of contributing to regional development and integration. From that foundation have sprung many other projects, one such project was MISTICA - Methodology and Social Impact of the Information and Communication Technologies in America – a virtual community of researchers and activists for sharing reflections on how the Internet can have a positive social impact in Latin America and the Caribbean. These aspects of his work are elaborated on by Daniel today.
His career has followed the theme of technology and linguistic and cultural diversity, and in the same year that the concept of the Namur Award was established in TC9 (1989). Daniel, with the support of the European Union and UNESCO and his team, produced the first PC based multilingual interface to networks (MULBRI). Since then have followed innumerable projects that have brought communities together in the study of ICT and its capacity and potential for beneficial development, and a research journey that has at its core what has become known as the ‘digital divide’.

Today we pay tribute to the endeavours of a colleague who shares and actively promotes the values at the heart of our Working Group. In recognition of Daniel’s outstanding contribution to raising awareness of the social implications of information technology, and to celebrate and further encourage his work it is with great pleasure that WG9.2 award him the 2008 Ninth IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award.Today, we are honouring a person who has dedicated his professional life to raising awareness of the social implications surrounding information technology, promoting its use in and for the developing world, and utilising it in the creation of virtual networks founded on ethical and democratic values.
In 1993, Daniel launched the Foundation Networks & Development (FUNREDES) an international NGO in Santo Domingo, dedicated to the dissemination of New Information and Communication Technologies (NICT) in developing countries with the objective of contributing to regional development and integration. From that foundation have sprung many other projects, one such project was MISTICA - Methodology and Social Impact of the Information and Communication Technologies in America – a virtual community of researchers and activists for sharing reflections on how the Internet can have a positive social impact in Latin America and the Caribbean. These aspects of his work are elaborated on by Daniel today.
His career has followed the theme of technology and linguistic and cultural diversity, and in the same year that the concept of the Namur Award was established in TC9 (1989). Daniel, with the support of the European Union and UNESCO and his team, produced the first PC based multilingual interface to networks (MULBRI). Since then have followed innumerable projects that have brought communities together in the study of ICT and its capacity and potential for beneficial development, and a research journey that has at its core what has become known as the ‘digital divide’.

Today we pay tribute to the endeavours of a colleague who shares and actively promotes the values at the heart of our Working Group. In recognition of Daniel’s outstanding contribution to raising awareness of the social implications of information technology, and to celebrate and further encourage his work it is with great pleasure that WG9.2 award him the 2008 Ninth IFIP-WG9.2 Namur Award.

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Institut d'Informatique -  10/23/2008